How to write a book about history

Faculty Resources For History Your professor may ask you to write a book review, probably of a scholarly historical monograph. Here are some questions you might ask of the book. Remember that a good review is critical, but critical does not necessarily mean negative.

How to write a book about history

Your introduction should include an overview of the book that both incorporates an encapsulated summary and a sense of your general judgment. This is the equivalent to a thesis statement. Do NOT spend more than one-third or so of the paper summarizing the book.

The summary should consist of a discussion and highlights of the major arguments, features, trends, concepts, themes, ideas, and characteristics of the book. While you may use direct quotes from the book make sure you always give the page numbersuch quotes should never be the bulk of the summary.

You might want to take the major organizing themes of the book and use them to organize your own discussion. This does NOT mean, however, that I want a chapter-by-chapter summary.

Your goal is a unified essay. So what do I want, if not just a summary? Throughout your summary, I want you to provide a critique of the book.

It is not necessarily negative. Nor do you need to know as much about the subject as the author because you hardly ever will. The skills you need are an ability to follow an argument and test a hypothesis.

Regardless of how negative or positive your critique is, you need to be able to justify and support your position. Here are a number of questions that you can address as part of your critique. You need not answer them all, but questions one and two are essential to any book review, so those must be included.

The answers should be part of a carefully constructed essay, complete with topic sentences and transitions. What is your overall opinion of the book? On what basis has this opinion been formulated? That is, tell the reader what you think and how you arrived at this judgment.

What did you expect to learn when you picked up the book?

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To what extent — and how effectively — were your expectations met? Did you nod in agreement or off to sleep?

how to write a book about history

Did you wish you could talk back to the author? Amplify upon and explain your reactions. How clearly and in what context is it stated and, subsequently, developed? To what extent and how effectively i. Use examples to amplify your responses.

If arguments or perspectives were missing, why do you think this might be? How well have they been achieved, especially with regard to the way the book is organized? Are these aims supported or justified? You might look back at the introduction to the book for help.

What assumptions lie behind these points? How effectively does the author draw claims from the material being presented?

Are connections between the claims and evidence made clearly and logically? Here you should definitely use examples to support your evaluation. What conclusions does the author reach and how clearly are they stated? Do these conclusions follow from the thesis and aims and from the ways in which they were developed?Writing a book review is one of the fundamental skills that every historian must learn.

An undergraduate student’s book review should accomplish two main goals. The Inside team does a consistently fantastic job delivering the right news at the right time, in an immediately relatable way. I get a lot of 'news' emails, but the Daily Brief is the only one I find time to read no matter how busy things are.

Studybay is an academic writing service for students: essays, term papers, dissertations and much more! We're trusted and chosen by many students all over the world! A book is both a usually portable physical object and the body of immaterial representations or intellectual object whose material signs—written or drawn lines or other two-dimensional media—the physical object contains or houses..

As a physical object, a book is a stack of usually rectangular pages (made of papyrus, parchment, vellum, or . Providing educators and students access to the highest quality practices and resources in reading and language arts instruction.

Historiography is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches.

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