Descartes and the idea that god exists

Term Papers 5 pages, words Why does Descartes think he can be sure that a God who is no deceiver exists Are his arguments convincing Descartes considers himself to be sure that there is a non-deceiving God by using two different arguments in the Meditations: Although Descartes believes that they are both capable of proving the existence of God indubitably, some consideration of the arguments suggests that they are not convincing as he considers them to be. The trademark argument appears early on in the work, in the third meditation.

Descartes and the idea that god exists

Term Papers 5 pages, words Why does Descartes think he can be sure that a God who is no deceiver exists Are his arguments convincing Descartes considers himself to be sure that there is a non-deceiving God by using two different arguments in the Meditations: Although Descartes believes that they are both capable of proving the existence of God indubitably, some consideration of the arguments suggests that they are not convincing as he considers them to be.

The trademark argument appears early on in the work, in the third meditation. It is important to remember the context in which the argument is used: Descartes has removed from his acceptance anything that is doubtable, and is left with the cogito.

Any argument for a non-deceiving God will necessarily have to come from within himself, as that is all he has left. The trademark argument can be summed up as two simple premises: One way in which this argument can easily be disproved Descartes and the idea that god exists if it can be shown that Descartes does not possess an idea of God.

To merely say, though, that just because Descartes lacks a complete understanding of Gods in finite nature means he lacks an idea of God would not, on its own, be able to disprove this.

To understand the idea of God does not require one to understand all that goes with the idea: One can have the idea of how radio works whilst still lacking an understanding of the actual details of radio waves. What, though, is unconvincing about this argument, even at this stage, is the idea of saying an infinite being exists, but its infiniteness can never be fully understood by a finite being, thus God exists and gave us all the idea of him.

The use of words appears to be too arbitrary infinite, omnipotent, and omniscient all appear in the text to define the concept of God by Descartes. God exists if L entails GL Logic is "the laws of Second if God has established these laws of reasoning then there These are, though, just words.

Although the meanings of these words are likely to be understood, it is still the case that these abstract concepts can be applied by anyone to anything, without the slightest worry about their correct use. One can have the idea of an omnipotent and infinite being, and not believe it.

The atheist is just as unable to explain what this concept actually involves as the theist. To admit to being able to understand the concept of God appears unlikely: It has been suggested by some critics that by merely negating our finitude we can have an understanding of infinity. Descartes seems to take the opposite view, and asserts that our finiteness is a negation of Gods infiniteness, because in order to recognise our own finiteness, an understanding of infinity is required.

This approach, though, again seems to involve playing with words rather than actually solving the problem. Even so, there is still the question of how this idea of God was created.

It seems right to say that ideas have causes, although it would be futile to always maintain that the cause of one idea was another idea, as ultimately there has to be a cause of the idea. Only God, it is maintained, in a repetition of the classic first cause argument, could have originated this idea.

It would be acceptable to presume that the idea of God was taught by one generation to the next, although this would disrupt the assertion that we all have an internal idea of God.

Only Descartes assertion that no finite being could have produced an idea of an infinite being fits this argument. Descartes uses the idea of degrees of reality to explain this. God, I will shed some light on three different arguments:Descartes' ontological argument goes as follows: (1) Our idea of God is of a perfect being, (2) it is more perfect to exist than not to exist, (3) therefore, God must exist.

The second argument that Descartes gives for this conclusion is far more complex. Descartes’ Proof Of The Existence For centuries, the idea of God has been a part of man’s history.

Descartes and the idea that god exists

Past and present, there has always been a different integration consisting of the believers and the non-believers of God. Descartes' Proof of the Existence of God in Meditation Three This paper is intended to explain and evaluate Descartes' proof for the existence of god in Meditation Three.

It shall show the weaknesses in the proof, but also give credit to the strengths in his proof. Also, the idea in me that perfection exists, must have arisen from a perfect being, therefore God exists. Descartes argues that he has a perfect and trenchant thought of God.

In a similar manner cogito is axiomatic, so is the existence of God, as his impeccable idea of an impeccable being could not have been brought about by anything to a.

Descartes and the idea that god exists

René Descartes' () "Proofs of God's Existence" is a series of arguments that he posits in his treatise (formal philosophical observation) "Meditations on First Philosophy," first appearing in "Meditation III.

of God: that He exists." and discussed in more depth in "Meditation V: Of. Since we have an idea with infinite objective reality (namely, the idea of God), Descartes is able to conclude that there is a being with infinite formal reality who caused this idea.

In other words, God exists.

Descartes' Ontological Argument (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)