An analysis of the use of symbols in lord of the flies

Lord of the Flies was last modified: January 19th, by Jenny Sawyer Author: Every kid dreams of what life would be like without adults.

An analysis of the use of symbols in lord of the flies

Ralph, tall, with dark hair, twelve year old, establishes himself as the leader of the boys when he blows the conch shell to call the first assembly. Throughout the story, he struggles to maintain order, forced to compete with Jack for respect.

After losing the election for leader to Ralph, he voluntarily takes charge of hunting and maintaining the signal fire. As the structure of life on the island breaks down, Jack forms a tribe of savage boys on the far side of the island. Piggy, an obese, asthmatic boy with myopic vision, clings to civilization and refuses to adopt the new, less structured way of life.

His physical weaknesses are preyed upon by the other boys, particularly Jack, but Ralph learns to depend upon Piggy for intellectual guidance. Simon, skinny with blond hair, is a saint-like presence on the island, neither particularly popular nor despised. Although he spends much of his time alone in the jungle, he is willing to help with necessary chores such as building the huts.

It is during one of these solitary journeys into the jungle that he speaks with the "Lord of the Flies," who confirms the belief that he has tried to share with the others, that the "beast" comes from within them.

Roger, the most savage of the boys, engages in the sadistic torture of a pig, of Piggy and of the littluns. His name, Germanic in origin, means "spear. Sam and Eric are twins who merge into a single identity, "Samneric," as the story progresses. Percival, small, younger, blond hair boy with a fearful presence.

His apprehension to speak is preyed upon by the other boys. His superstition raises the fear of the "Beastie. The first set of impulses might be thought of as the "civilizing instinct," which encourages people to work together toward common goals and behave peacefully; the second set of impulses might be thought of as the "barbarizing instinct," or the instinct to savagery, which urges people to rebel against civilization, seeking anarchy, chaos, despotism, and violence.

In The Lord of the Flies the civilizing impulse is represented by a number of key characters and symbols, including Ralph, Piggy, and the conch shell the boys use to call meetings. The conflict between Jack and Ralph, as it develops, represents the conflict between the civilizing impulse and the impulse to savagery both within the individual and within society as a whole, as the boys marooned on the island gradually reject the restraints of civilization in favor of a primal, violent, primitive existence of hunting, feasting, and homicide.

Because its story is allegorical, The Lord of the Flies can be interpreted in many ways, and during the s and s a number of readings of the book attempted to connect it with extraordinarily grand historical, religious, and psychological schemes, claiming that the book dramatized the history of civilization or the history of religion, or the struggle between the Freudian components of unconscious identity, id, ego, and superego.

The one truly complicating element in the novel is the character of Simon. The other characters in the novel abandon moral behavior as soon as civilization no longer imposes it upon them: This is true even of Ralph and Piggy to an extent; in the psychology of the novel, the civilizing impulse is not as deeply rooted in the human psyche as the savage impulse.

But Simon continues to act morally on the island; he behaves kindly to the younger children, and he is the first to realize the problem posed by the beast and the Lord of the Flies--that there is no external monster, but that rather a monster lurks within each human being.HOMEPAGE _____ CHARACTERS ANALYSIS.

Ralph . Ralph, tall, with dark hair, twelve year old, establishes himself as the leader of the boys when he blows the conch shell to call the first assembly.

Ralph. Ralph is the athletic, charismatic protagonist of Lord of the Flies. Elected the leader of the boys at the beginning of the novel, Ralph is the primary representative of order, civilization, and productive leadership in the novel. The Use of Symbolism in The Lord of the Flies by William Golding A symbol is something concrete that represents another thing or idea.

In Lord Of The Flies a lot of things we encounter are given symbolic meaning by the way the author William Golding uses them.

Activity 1. Major Symbols and Characters as Symbols.

Lord of the Flies Questions and Answers - initiativeblog.com

Have partners or individuals create visual images of the island, the conch, the Lord of the Flies effigy, and fire as it appears in Lord of the initiativeblog.com the images around the classroom, and allow a “gallery walk” for students to peruse them.

Symbols Symbols are objects, characters, figures, and colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts. The Conch Shell. Ralph and Piggy discover the conch shell on the beach at the start of the novel and use it to summon the boys together after the crash separates them.

A summary of the plot, characters, themes, symbols and motifs, and key vocabulary for Lord of the Flies. Perfect for revision for literature courses including GCSE.

An analysis of the use of symbols in lord of the flies

Can be used to sequence a scheme of work in a knowledge unit or for student revision.

SparkNotes: Lord of the Flies: Themes